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How A Tailored Suit Is Made

By Doris Walker

A team of highly skilled people make each bespoke suit; it takes them at least 8 weeks and over 80 hours to make a high quality bespoke suit. There are 300 processes or steps involved in producing each suit.

To begin with, the customer has to be measured in detail by the cutter. The cutter looks at the client’s posture and physical characteristics to form a picture of the client’s body in their minds eye. When the cutter cuts the cloth, they adjust the cut to take account of each client’s physical characteristics. If they feel that an element of the suits styling will not hang correctly on a clients body type they will discuss the options and alternatives with the client.

Once the cloth has been cut the parts are temporarily hand stitched together by a tailor to form the ‘baste’. The ‘baste’ is not complete it has no pockets, buttons, zips or lapels.

Once the ‘baste’ is ready the client is to asked to attend their first fitting. With the ‘baste’ on the client the cutter marks in chalk any further alterations that are needed. At this stage, if the client is not happy with the style of the suit it can still be altered.

The ‘baste’ is taken away, if there are many alterations, or your suit seems more complicated than normal to the cutter you may be asked for a second baste fitting. Normally this is not necessary and the suit is sewn together properly by a qualified tailor prior to your next fitting. At the next fitting, you will try your suit on again and the cutter will assess the alterations that have been made by the tailor. Further minor adjustments can be made at this stage, but it is too late to radically alter the style of the suit. The suit still does not look finished at this stage.

The suit is completed by the tailor with any chalked alterations from the second fitting being included in the suit’s final alterations. The client then tries the suit once more, provided both the cutter and the client are both happy with the resulting suit the client takes the suit home. If either party is not happy then the suit is sent back for further adjustments.

For the very best in Savile Row bespoke suits, visit Jasper Littman of London for the highest quality tailored suits including a unique Wedding suit.

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Article Citation
MLA Style Citation:
Walker, Doris "How A Tailored Suit Is Made." How A Tailored Suit Is Made. 21 Aug. 2010. uberarticles.com. 5 Apr 2015 <http://uberarticles.com/beauty/fashion/how-a-tailored-suit-is-made/>.

APA Style Citation:
Walker, D (2010, August 21). How A Tailored Suit Is Made. Retrieved April 5, 2015, from http://uberarticles.com/beauty/fashion/how-a-tailored-suit-is-made/

Chicago Style Citation:
Walker, Doris "How A Tailored Suit Is Made" uberarticles.com. http://uberarticles.com/beauty/fashion/how-a-tailored-suit-is-made/


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