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Skin Inflamation In Dogs

By Owen Jones_

We are inclined to think of dogs as being tough; animals that can take care of themselves; animals that are far more in contact with nature than we humans are and we kind of admire them for it, in a way. However, the truth is that dogs come under many of the stresses that we do including pollution and junk food, even though they do not have to do the nine-to-five or sit in traffic jams, which are of our own making anyway.

Most of the stresses that dogs suffer are not of their own causing, they are our fault as well. These stresses often out themselves in much the same way as they do with us in neuroses, anti-social behaviour and skin problems amongst other ways. In this piece, I want to talk about some of the most common sorts of canine skin irritation, not all of which can be attributed to human activity.

The prime cause of bad skin in dogs is fleas in the town and fleas and ticks in the countryside. The cause of the irritation is these parasites’ saliva. A dog’s immune system can handle a few fleas, but the trouble comes when he is infested. Temporary infestation can happen quite easily, but normally it is a symptom of neglect. If a dog was brushed every week, the problem would not get out of control.

Often a neglected dog will look mangy because he has pulled his hair out and injured his skin with continuous scratching, try to rid himself of his tormentors. If the dog had remained in a pack like it was born to tens of thousands of years ago, it would be groomed every day by its companions. A domestic dog relies on its owner to do this for him. You could liken it to a child crawling with lice waiting for its parents to do something about it.

You can treat it and prevent it happening by bathing your dog in insecticidal shampoo as indicated on the label and dusting him and his box with flea powder on a regular basis, say, in conjunction with his weekly grooming.

A similar looking condition is mange. Mange is caused by tiny parasitic mites burrowing under your dog’s skin. Again, your dog can handle a few mites, but an infestation is grave. It can also be caught by humans, but our bodies usually clear the problem up. However, your dog will be driven to distraction by an infestation of mites.

If you cannot find scores of fleas on your dog, it is probably mange, also known as scabies. You should be able to catch this early if you see red, perhaps bleeding patches of skin. Your vet or pet shop can sell you something to cure it fairly quickly.

Mosquitoes can be as much, if not more of a bother to dogs than they are to us. Mosquitoes harass dogs on the snout and genitals, but you cannot put DEET or other creams for humans for the reason that they will lick the chemical off causing stomach problems. You can apply lemon juice or oil scented with grated lemon rind and lemon juice, because mosquitoes hate lemon smells.

If your dog’s skin issue does not fit into any of these categories, then he is perhaps suffering from an allergy or pollution of some sort and you will have to take him to a vet.

Owen Jones, the author of this piece writes on many subjects, but is currently concerned with indoor mosquito repellent. If you would like to know more or check out some great offers, please go to our website at Mosquito Repellent For Dogs.

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Article Citation
MLA Style Citation:
Jones_, Owen "Skin Inflamation In Dogs." Skin Inflamation In Dogs. 25 Aug. 2010. uberarticles.com. 1 Jan 2015 <http://uberarticles.com/beauty/skin/skin-inflamation-in-dogs/>.

APA Style Citation:
Jones_, O (2010, August 25). Skin Inflamation In Dogs. Retrieved January 1, 2015, from http://uberarticles.com/beauty/skin/skin-inflamation-in-dogs/

Chicago Style Citation:
Jones_, Owen "Skin Inflamation In Dogs" uberarticles.com. http://uberarticles.com/beauty/skin/skin-inflamation-in-dogs/


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