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Could an Accounts Receivable Agency Halt Continuous Microtransactions?

By Rob Sutter

Video games that seem grossly overpriced often make me ashamed of this particular hobby I am a fan of. How many people have played games and you realized that they were not worth the time you spend on them? Imagine having that same feeling while purchasing money for it when you feel as though the content should have been there the moment you put down a premium amount. This is where I could see an accounts receivable agency coming in so that this wrong would be righted.

For those of you, who don’t know what microtransactions are; allow me to give you a brief synopsis. Basically, these are smaller purchases that can be made to the games that you have, allowing you to procure items like weapons, supplements like potions, or even alternate costumes to allow your character to utilize. I have a few problems with these and they are ones that a few people may disagree with. From my experience, though, gamers would rather do away with them.

These are small transactions done in games and for those in free titles, I cannot complain much. They did not cost anything to play to begin with so charging for smaller items which can be easily obtained is not something that I can point the blame finger at. However, I can’t help but think that full console experiences should be hampered by these. When these are seen, it seems like companies are saying that it’s okay to pinch as much money out of its fans as humanly possible.

There’s a savvy nature about gamers and the products they put money into, especially since a good number of them do the research beforehand. However, that isn’t something that can be said for the gaming public overall since quite a few people simply want to play and do not care much about news, reviews, and what have you. This isn’t an idea that’s going to help the situation but I believe that an accounts receivable agency can do that well. There are organizations along the lines of Rapid Recovery which can offer assistance to these cheated gamers.

I am the kind of gamer who enjoys supporting companies for the jobs that they do well. When a developer puts forth a good title and I want to support it, more often than not I am going to vote with my wallet. The opposite goes for the titles which seem to pass themselves off as ones that have all of the work done when there are quite a few instances locked away. The reason for this is nothing short of greed and the drive to gain more money than a standard game calls for.

Visit Accounts Receivable Collection Agency, Rapid Recovery Solution, if you are searching for more information about what collection services they offer.. Unique version for reprint here: Could an Accounts Receivable Agency Halt Continuous Microtransactions?.

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Article Citation
MLA Style Citation:
Sutter, Rob "Could an Accounts Receivable Agency Halt Continuous Microtransactions?." Could an Accounts Receivable Agency Halt Continuous Microtransactions?. 10 Apr. 2013. uberarticles.com. 2 Aug 2014 <http://uberarticles.com/business/could-an-accounts-receivable-agency-halt-continuous-microtransactions/>.

APA Style Citation:
Sutter, R (2013, April 10). Could an Accounts Receivable Agency Halt Continuous Microtransactions?. Retrieved August 2, 2014, from http://uberarticles.com/business/could-an-accounts-receivable-agency-halt-continuous-microtransactions/

Chicago Style Citation:
Sutter, Rob "Could an Accounts Receivable Agency Halt Continuous Microtransactions?" uberarticles.com. http://uberarticles.com/business/could-an-accounts-receivable-agency-halt-continuous-microtransactions/


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