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Lozenges And Cough Drops Full Of Sugar

By Andrew Hamilton

The man was advanced in age and had an unusual tooth decay, which was a black hole found on the outside of one of his two front teeth. It turns out the man gagged on his heart medicine when he stuck the nitroglycerine tablets under his tongue where they’re supposed to go so instead he stuck them under his top lip. And they ate the hole in his tooth.

Hundreds of medicines that Americans take every day, from the country’s most popular blood pressure pills to chewable vitamin C tablets, can cause serious tooth decay and gum disease, oral medicine experts told the American Dental Association. Many doctors either don’t know about these dental side effects or don’t warn patients, the specialists said.

A dentist and pharmacologist at the University of Buffalo stated that they persuade dentists to inquire about the medication that their patients take. Look carefully at them, think carefully about what they can do, he advises dentists.

Oral medicine experts who were also instructor at this week’s ADA meeting list down the following facts. Statistics show that about 20% of patients who take calcium channel blockers develop gum swelling. Pockets in the gums caused by inflammation create entrances for bacteria, and this leads to massive swelling and gum disease. These medicines include some of the nation’s biggest selling drugs.

Swelling is a side effect of amphetamines used to treat children’s hyperactivity, as well as anti epilepsy drugs. A drug used by organ transplant recipients, cyclosporin can cause massive gum swelling. According to the dentist, its appearance can be mistaken for the inflammation caused by leukemia.

More than 400 drugs cause dry mouth, as can radiation treatment for cancer. When people don’t have enough saliva, they may suffer cavities, excess plaque, and fungal infections. The problems are serious enough that the dentist will ask doctors to switch patients with swollen gums from calcium channel blockers to another heart medicine if possible.

If not, then it is recommended that their plaque buildup be monitored and that trips to the dentist have to be done every two months. You can avoid gum side effects if you just keep your mouth clean at all times, another dentist pointed out. If no plaque can be found in the mouth, then there’s nothing to worry about, he said.

The gums of the Dilantin patient in the picture he had were swelling so badly that only the tips of his front teeth were seen. Treatment of the gum pockets within 10 days is recommended by him for patients going on Dilantin to minimize the condition. Dentists don’t just point to prescription drugs as a problem. Another problem would be over the counter lozenges and cough drops which contain sugar.

In one woman’s case, cavities were always showing all throughout her mouth. Dentists couldn’t understand why she had this condition when she brushed regularly and did not eat so many sweets. When the receptionist saw her taking pills, the woman said that she consumed three packs of antacid every day.

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Article Citation
MLA Style Citation:
Hamilton, Andrew "Lozenges And Cough Drops Full Of Sugar." Lozenges And Cough Drops Full Of Sugar. 4 Jul. 2010. uberarticles.com. 25 Jul 2014 <http://uberarticles.com/health-and-fitness/lozenges-and-cough-drops-full-of-sugar/>.

APA Style Citation:
Hamilton, A (2010, July 4). Lozenges And Cough Drops Full Of Sugar. Retrieved July 25, 2014, from http://uberarticles.com/health-and-fitness/lozenges-and-cough-drops-full-of-sugar/

Chicago Style Citation:
Hamilton, Andrew "Lozenges And Cough Drops Full Of Sugar" uberarticles.com. http://uberarticles.com/health-and-fitness/lozenges-and-cough-drops-full-of-sugar/


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