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Dealing With Depression In Dogs

By Shari Evans

Whenever an enthusiastic and playful dog suddenly becomes quiet, lazy and refuses to eat, pet parents tend to go on a panic thinking that their baby pooch might be sick of something. The truth is that, illness is not just the cause of this strange attitude as this is only a part of a bigger struggle which is known as depression. Dogs that have fallen victim to this shows laziness, loss of appetite, clinging, anxiousness, lethargy and oversleeping. There are many causes behind depression and knowing them will help you understand your dog’s feelings towards different things that are happening around the both of you.

Reasons why Dogs Suffer from Depression

Once you have found the signs of despair on dogs, the first question that may come to your mind is why. There are many possible answers for this and some can be very obvious. Canine depression is caused by many things and most of those are the same reasons why people are falling into a depressed state. Diseases can be one of the best downers. If a dog is not feeling well, they will refuse to join some activities and just lie down in a corner so that they can rest and recover. Medication adds up to the burden and it contributes to their depression.

For a creature who loves stability, changes can automatically result to anxiety. Moving to a different house, divorce and change of owner’s work can make the dog worry and feel bad emotionally. Environment is also another factor for a canine’s depression. Most dogs would love to go outside and play. If they have experienced outdoor activities and they will be deprived of it for days or weeks, this will make them feel lonely and depressed. Like in humans, loss or death of a loved one is truly a devastating event. If people or other pets in the house that have regularly been part of the dog’s life are gone, they will surely grieve and feel a great loss about it.

Cure for a Dog’s Depression

Time can heal the depression and dogs can recover on their own like people. There are also some cases when people are dependent of others when it comes to enlightening themselves and moving forward from different events of their life. This can be the same for dogs, which means that you as a pet parent should comfort then and help them go back to their former selves. Before you totally involve yourself on their dilemma, it is important for you to see point out the reason of depression so you will know when and where to start coming from.

Dogs love so much attention from their pet parents and this is the key for their recovery from depression. You can try to play with them or do something they love to cheer them up. If they tend to ignore or they still feel heavy to do different things, you can just rely on the power of snuggling. Take the time to sit beside them for a gentle petting and a playful cuddle. Once he showed some sign of improvement, give him a reward for it. In case that your dog remained to be the same for days, call a veterinarian or a canine psychiatrist for assistance.

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Article Citation
MLA Style Citation:
Evans, Shari "Dealing With Depression In Dogs." Dealing With Depression In Dogs. 6 Mar. 2014. uberarticles.com. 2 Aug 2014 <http://uberarticles.com/pets/dog/dealing-with-depression-in-dogs/>.

APA Style Citation:
Evans, S (2014, March 6). Dealing With Depression In Dogs. Retrieved August 2, 2014, from http://uberarticles.com/pets/dog/dealing-with-depression-in-dogs/

Chicago Style Citation:
Evans, Shari "Dealing With Depression In Dogs" uberarticles.com. http://uberarticles.com/pets/dog/dealing-with-depression-in-dogs/


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